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HBWRL


HBWRL SEASON 4 FINAL STANDINGS
AND LEAGUE LEADERS*

W L GB PCT. RS RA PYTH
Silicon Valley Chips 13 5 -- .722 75 66 10-8
Broome Stickpins 10 8 3 .556 73 71 9-9
Silicon Valley Chips 7 11 4 .389 67 78 8-10
James Maids 8 10 5 .444 68 61 10-8

World Series: Chips 4, Stickpins 2.
INDIVIDUAL LEADERS

Batting


BATTING AVERAGE
1. Jimmie Foxx, Stickpins .464
2. Stan Musial, Chips .413 (2nd in batting race back-to-back seasons)
3. Arky Vaughan, Reps .407
4. Bill Dickey, Chips .392
5. Joe DiMaggio, Chips .377

SLUGGING PERCENTAGE
1. Dickey .649
2. Foxx .565
3. Vaughan .542
4. Richie Allen, Reps .500
5. Musial .488

MVP: Dickey
HOMERUNS: Dickey, 5
RUNS SCORED: Fred Clarke, Maids, 13
RBI: Musial, 13
DOUBLES: Dickey; Joe Morgan, Maids; Joe Cronin, Chips; 4 each
STOLEN BASES: Ty Cobb, Chips, 7
Pitching


EARNED RUN AVERAGE (ERA), Min. 3 Games Started
1. Juan Marichal, Chips 1.53
2. Walter Johnson, Reps 2.11
3. Addie Joss, Stickpins 2.55

HITS/INNINGS PITCHED (H/IP), Min. 6 IP
1. Cy Young, Reps 0.89
2. Sandy Koufax, Reps 1.03
3. Robin Roberts, Maids 1.04
4. Joss 1.06
5. Bob Feller, Maids 1.11

WINS: Jack Chesbro, Chips, 4
SAVES: Pete Alexander, Stickpins, 3
STRIKEOUTS: Johnson, 40
TEAM STATISTICS

Batting


BATTING AVERAGE
1. Stickpins .352
2. Chips .338
3. Maids .331
4. Reps .317

SLUGGING PERCENTAGE
1. Stickpins .446
2. Chips .422
3. Maids .399
4. Reps .392
Pitching


EARNED RUN AVERAGE (ERA)
1. Maids 2.87
2. Chips 3.21
3. Reps 3.44
4. Stickpins 3.74
HITS/INNINGS PITCHED (H/IP)
1. Maids 1.26
2. Stickpins 1.32
3. Reps 1.39
4. Chips 1.51

SEASON SUMMARY:

The dramatic decline of the Reps was matched by the dramatic improvement of the Chips in Season 4. That set up a classic Chips/Stickpins World Series. The teams had effectively swaped left fielders entering the season, with charter Chip Joe Jackson going to the Stickpins in exchange for Stan Musial. Musial did as well in his new digs as his old ones-he is the only player in history to finish in the top two in batting average in consecutive seasons. And he did it on two different teams.

Musial outplayed Jackson in both the regular season and the Series, and that was a key in the Chips' win. The Chips took 4 of 6 from the Stickpins during the regular season, despite being outscored, 28-20. In the Series, the Chips took 4 of 6, and were outscored, 28-20. That eerie fact was compounded by the most bizarre ending ever to a World Series. The Chips seemed to have things locked up, leading the Series 3 games to 2 and leading 4-1 over the Stickpins in Game 6. But the Stickpins rallied in the top of the 9th to tie the game at 4-4, then Willie Mays' bases loaded walk gave the Stickpins a 5-4 lead. Now the Series seem destined for a decisive 7th game.

But with Whitey Ford pitching and a man on first, Joe Jackson dropped Musial's routine fly ball. It rolled to the wall and carrommed, Jackson slipped, and by the time Stickpins centerfielder Mickey Mantle had retrieved it, Musial had a 4-base, 2-run error, giving the Chips the game, 6-5, and the Series, 4-2. It was the only World Series ever to end on an error, and was only too reminiscent of Jackson's antics on the 1919 Chicago Blacksox. The Commissioner investigated, but Jackson was never charged. The bizarre ending put an exclamation point on the Chips' only championship during the league's first 10 years.